Event: Heritage

— 9 Nov 2016 by Lauren Furey

Dubstep is a big part of Croydon's musical heritage and so, it was only right that we hold an authentic dubstep event that brings the sound back to its roots.

On Thursday 3 November, we were joined by Crazy D, N-Type, Chef and, our special guest, Plastician for a night of heavy bass-lines, cracking snares and weighty kicks. The lure of dubstep is still strong. So strong that even before we'd had a chance to run any promotion for the event, it had completely sold out. 

The earliest dubstep releases can be traced back to the late 90's, when pioneering producers El-B and Zed Bias were beginning to create darker, experimental mixes of dub and 2-step garage. In the early noughties, it was Croydon's Big Apple Records that played an instrumental part in taking this new genre to the masses. Young producers like Skream, Benga, Hatcha and Plastician were really starting to push the boundaries of dubstep and began releasing 12-inch singles through Big Apple. Platforms like Rinse FM helped to cement dubstep in the underground music scene and, before long, events like FWD's Filthy Dub and Brixton's DMZ nights were really pushing the sound to new heights. Towards the end of the decade, Dubstep had gone across the pond and taken on a revolutionary twist that brought it closer to rock music than its garage/dub origins. 

Sadly, Big Apple Records no longer sits on Surrey Street Market but the sound very much lives on and the crowd showed that when they arrived in their droves for Heritage at Boxpark Croydon.

The night was a heavy mix of original tracks, fresh remixes and exclusives and it really felt like a throwback to the long (but not forgotten) events of yesteryear, where the crowd cared for nothing but the music. There's something extremely  honest and unpretentious about dubstep and its fans have always remained true to the sound. So, a big thank you to everyone that came down for Heritage. You showed a true dedication and passion for dubstep and, above all, you showed it very much still has its heart in Croydon.

Check out the video to see how it went down.